After ‘After the Contemporary’ + IT’S OK. ↘

When:
January 20, 2018 – March 3, 2018 all-day
2018-01-20T00:00:00-08:00
2018-03-04T00:00:00-08:00
Where:
Charlie James Gallery
969 CHUNG KING ROAD
LOS ANGELES
CA 90012
Contact:
Charlie James Gallery
213.687.0844

Gallery Hours: Wed – Sun 12pm – 5pm
Artist Reception, January 20, 6-9pm

Charlie James Gallery is pleased to present After’ After the Contemporary’, an exhibition of new and recent works on paper by New York-based artist William Powhida. The title of the exhibition refers to Powhida’s recent solo exhibition at the Aldrich Contemporary Museum of Art where the artist created a fictional retrospective look back from the year 2050 at the Contemporary period of art history. Here the artist presents one hundred and twenty 15″ x 15″ real and fictional Artforum advertisements [1] to create a darkly humorous, visual chronology of the period, which the artist defines as lasting from year 2000 until 2025, when it will come to an end along with other current social and cultural formations like democracy.

Charlie James Gallery is pleased to present IT’S OK. ↘ a group exhibition curated by Sacha Baumann, featuring Nadege Monchera Baer, Hayley Barker, Megan Mueller, Stephen Neidich, Kottie Paloma, Molly Segal, and Luke Whitlatch.
John Laroche: You know why I like plants?
Susan Orlean: Nuh uh.
John Laroche: Because they’re so mutable. Adaptation is a profound process. Means you figure out how to thrive in the world.
Susan Orlean: Yeah but it’s easier for plants. I mean they have no memory. They just move on to whatever’s next. With a person though, adapting is almost shameful. It’s like running away.
-excerpt from Adaptation, screenplay by Charlie Kaufman and Donald Kaufman, adapted from the book, The Orchid Thief, by Susan Orlean
Seven artists explore the profound process of adaptation, eschewing any shame. In fact, it’s OK to adapt in an effort to be well-suited for the current moment or for an imagined future, despite the awkwardness mutability may expose. The artists employ disparate approaches: adjusting art practice to the space in which it is displayed, creating icons based on truths, adapting by moving on, creating armors for  protection and dazzling displays, to both attract suitors and repel enemies. In IT’S OK. ↘, adaptation is playful, practical, anticipatory, necessary, and sometimes excessive.